Archetype Sighting! Scarred Heroine

Bites, Lashes, Trauma, and Plot Device When the heroine has scars—indicative of a brutal backstory—which she considers disfiguring and the hero assures her are a testament of her strength The violence or abuse that caused the scars will typically interfere in the romantic relationship. At the very least because the heroine thinks she's not good … Continue reading Archetype Sighting! Scarred Heroine

Genre Police! Heroes that are too many tropes

When a writer creates a hero that's too many things, she has to fill the reader's expectations for that hero, plot-wise and romance-wise. Juggling too many and fitting them all in one book is difficult—though not impossible—and makes the story and the hero seem over the top.

Unmasked Heroines in Regency Romance

Yes, mentally, Charlotte is still a woman, and proves to be more than capable of doing a "man's" job, working as a secretary, but physically she is no longer the "fairer sex." Charlotte proves her mental and emotional mettle, but by transforming, she doesn't validate that women are physically as capable as men.

Trope Sighting! Vampires and Telepathy

When the hero and heroine DON'T have a telepathic relationship exactly... Reversing or confounding mental invasion in vampire romances indicates significant change to the archetype. In monster theory, one of the vampire's greatest weapons is the ability to penetrate personal sanctums/the mind. Also note that the telepathic abilities are a burden to the possessor, causing … Continue reading Trope Sighting! Vampires and Telepathy

Genre Police! Relying on Genre Terms in Werewolf Romance

Bless their hearts, whatever they were thinking, including all the guys with the next "Great American Novel," they didn't laugh. And damn it, the number of people who read the genre gives the concept validity. Explaining the concepts to those unfamiliar with the genre, standing up for them, has made me take a harder look at the common core of paranormal romance.